Bail

Why You Shouldn’t Flee While on Bail

The reason skipping court is such a significant infraction can be better understood if bail is explained. In the event of a criminal charge, bail is the amount of money you or a loved one can put up to get you out of jail and keep you there until your court appearance. If someone pays your bail, that person will probably work with a bail agent for bail bonds in Middletown; check here.

Bail is a promise to the court that you will show up for all hearings and appearances throughout your case. Posting bond and meeting the court’s requirements entitles you to return home to be with your loved ones while you fight for your freedom and safety. However, if you break your pledge, your predicament could get a lot worse. If you flee after posting bail, here’s what could happen.

Your bond may be revoked

First, you should know the trial judge has the authority to cancel your bond if you cannot comply with its terms. During this process, judges have the discretion to make their own decisions. Some may allow you to take a break and continue on your bond, while others will push you hard and revoke your bond if you make a mistake even one time. Your lawyer needs to know how liberal or conservative your court will be before you choose them.

A warrant may be issued for your arrest

It is not like posting a bond and being released on your recognizance eliminates the charges you have been charged with. You will be required to appear in court and be present at all hearings. A bench warrant may be issued for your arrest if you fail to appear. You can get out of jail with your bail money, but you have to obey the court’s guidelines to keep it. Failing to appear in court will cause a warrant to be issued if you flee after your release.

More strict conditions

If you break your bond, your new bond will have even more stringent restrictions. You could be forced to report to your court officer more frequently. You may have to appear in court more frequently. If your last bail violation involved fleeing the state, you might even be required to wear an ankle tracking device.

You should not be surprised if your new bail conditions are even more demanding than your previous ones. The court has broad authority to ensure that you comply with the conditions. Your attorney can push for a softer sentence. However, you should be aware that every time you break your bond, your lawyer loses leverage.

You will be charged with additional offenses

Failing to appear for your court date may cause additional charges to be filed against you. In a way, bail bonds are offered as a favor. As long as you adhere to the guidelines, nothing will go wrong. More charges may be brought against you if you violate the bail terms. If a person violates the terms of their bail, the court has the authority to impose extra charges. As long as you are out on bond, show up to your hearings and abide by all the requirements.

The amount of your bond can be increased

If your bail is revoked because you broke the terms of your release, expect to have to post a larger bond the following time around if you get out on bail. When a judge re-imposes your bail, there is no legal requirement for them to be benevolent. If they initially offered you a low bond, you can bet that they will raise it if you break your agreement again. In the end, the greater bond should show to you they are serious about the new bond.

Mostly, this will be very expensive. People who want to post bail must employ a bail bonding corporation, which charges them for doing so. To get out of jail, you have to give up more money as the bond amount rises. If you have been granted a low bond or personal recognizance bond by the judge, there is an added incentive to stick to the terms of your bail agreement from the beginning.

Although courts allow you to post bail to get out of jail pending your trial, posting bail does not absolve you of your criminal obligations. It is never a smart idea to skip bail. When you lie, you put yourself in jeopardy of getting into deeper problems than you were in before your arrest.

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