payment scams

What are the different types of online payment scams?

Wire transfer fraud

Wire transfer fraud is a type of business email compromise scam in which the victim receives an email request to make a wire payment from a vendor, sometimes including a copy of a purchase order or invoice for payment. The emails often come from compromised accounts and can appear to be legitimate, but they are designed to trick unsuspecting victims into wiring money directly to the fraudsters.

Spoofing attack

In one version of the scam, known as a “spoofing attack,” fraudsters send an email to a company’s Accounts Payable department that appears to come from a legitimate vendor. The email contains false statements and uses language that is intended to trick employees into completing a wire transfer payment. For example, the invoice may list a bogus vendor account number and email address, a copy of a valid purchase order may be included in the email, and the payment request may come from a trusted outside sales representative’s email address. The fraudster might also include phony shipping or invoice numbers to further support the validity of the request.

Business Email Compromise

In another version of a wire transfer scam known as the “Business Email Compromise,” fraudsters send emails to specific employees within a different departments to the persons who are doing general sales jobs 총판구인구직 or online sellers, directing them to make wire transfer payments to vendor bank accounts that they control.

These spoofing attacks and business email compromise scams can be used against businesses of all sizes and across all industries. The FBI is aware of multiple cases in which the wire transfer of funds to bank accounts is located in various countries, including Canada, China, France, Nigeria, and Thailand.

According to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3), more than 22,000 victims across the globe have collectively lost over $1 billion as a result of business email compromise scams since October 2013.

Skimming

Skimming refers to the theft of credit card information during an otherwise legitimate transaction. Skimming devices are designed to be affixed permanently onto gas station pumps, ATMs, point-of-sale (POS) terminals, or automated teller machines (ATMs). The skimmers record the payment card numbers and sometimes thieves also capture images of the keypad when customers enter their PINs.

The FBI has seen a recent increase in skimming incidents across the country, including at locations where individuals pay for fuel (gas stations), passport photos (quick photo businesses), and money orders (retailers like drug stores). Skimming is most likely to occur when an individual leaves his or her card available for swiping while making a payment, such as when customers swipe their cards before pumping gas or for paying with a card at a retail store.

In addition to traditional skimming devices, the popularity of mobile point-of-sale (POS) technology among retailers has made it easier for criminals to steal credit and debit card numbers from in-store transactions. Skimming can happen when card readers are used with mobile devices, allowing criminals to quickly gather the stolen credit and debit card numbers for use in making purchases or creating counterfeit payment cards that can be used in person or online. But somehow it is no longer workable in some cases. Toto Distributor 토토총판 managing all the data of all such sites.

Imposter scams

Imposter scams include a range of schemes in which someone pretends to be someone else—often, a government official or computer technician—to steal money or get personal information from you. The imposter might call, email, fax, or text message pretending to be a representative from a bank, credit card company, internet service provider (ISP), or government agency such as the IRS. They may claim there is a problem with your account or computer and they need to verify information such as credit card numbers, Social Security number, mother’s maiden name, passwords, and other personal data to help you resolve the issue.

unsolicited calls claiming

In some cases criminals also make unsolicited calls claiming to be law enforcement or government representatives attempting to collect unpaid taxes or fees. They might threaten victims with arrest, license revocation, or imprisonment for not paying.

ID spoofing

Another version of imposter scams involves the use of caller ID spoofing, which is when a call appears to be coming from a phone number that is associated with an organization you trust, like your financial institution or local police.

Advance fee schemes

Advance fee schemes involve an offer to provide something of value—usually money, but sometimes it is another item, such as a car—in exchange for a fee upfront. Victims are asked to pay the advance fee to receive their “prize,” but they never receive it or it’s of far less value than what was promised. Typically, victims are instructed to send payment via wire transfer to a designated location, sometimes overseas.

Lotteries and sweepstakes scams

Lotteries and sweepstakes scams occur when criminals use deceptive tactics to trick people into paying “fees” or taxes on lottery winnings that are never delivered. For example, the victims may be told they’ve won a lottery, but to claim their prize, they first have to send money for taxes or processing fees. The victims never see their winnings, because the criminals use the money to pay themselves or simply keep it for themselves after taking out a “fee.”

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